Github does some automatic detection of what “language” a repo “is”, as if a significant number of projects only use one language now. The detection is (as far as I can tell) a pure line-count, which means that if you have ever included jquery in your own repo, it’s likely that your project is now considered a “Javascript” project.

Whatever, right? It doesn’t matter. It’s misleading but ultimately worthless.

Except NOW recruiters have started cruising Github looking for engineers. Recruiters who (no diss) don’t understand programming. (They also don’t seem to understand the contributions bar chart, but that’s another matter.) They’re looking for keywords. They’re seeing keywords. They’re seeing Javascript on “my profile” when in fact a) the original work within those projects is more Ruby than anything else, b) the Javascript that IS being written is being written by collaborators committing to my repo, and c) I couldn’t Javascript my way out of a paper bag.

Compounded assumptions wasting everyone’s time.

Github does some automatic detection of what “language” a repo “is”, as if a significant number of projects only use one language now. The detection is (as far as I can tell) a pure line-count, which means that if you have ever included jquery in your own repo, it’s likely that your project is now considered a “Javascript” project.

Whatever, right? It doesn’t matter. It’s misleading but ultimately worthless.

Except NOW recruiters have started cruising Github looking for engineers. Recruiters who (no diss) don’t understand programming. (They also don’t seem to understand the contributions bar chart, but that’s another matter.) They’re looking for keywords. They’re seeing keywords. They’re seeing Javascript on “my profile” when in fact a) the original work within those projects is more Ruby than anything else, b) the Javascript that IS being written is being written by collaborators committing to my repo, and c) I couldn’t Javascript my way out of a paper bag.

Compounded assumptions wasting everyone’s time.